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  1. #11
    Senior Member K9F's Avatar
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    FXSE CVO BREAKOUT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy from Sandy View Post
    I would think on a commuter bike the more plastic the better..
    Agree totally. Harley-Davidsons whilst attractive they struggle with the British Winter climate, too much bling, metal fenders etc. and what has been deemed as a relatively poor finish. Carrying out my recent modifications with regards to suspension change and rear fender replacement it was quite an eye-opener after only 18 months the state of the bolts on the threads. This was despite a meticulous cleaning regime and regular application of ACF50. The CVO also doesn’t get used much in the Winter. Cutting through rush hour traffic and getting back and forth with regards to commuting a Harley-Davidson is far from ideal on many of our congested roads and the condition of them, predominantly that is why I bought the small KTM. At a very reasonable cost it can be ridden ragged through the Winter and if I get a couple of years or more out of it I’ll be happy and it will have served it's purpose well.


    Last edited by K9F; 12-10-2018 at 06:12 PM.

    IF YOU GO THROUGH LIFE WITH YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND.....ALL PEOPLE WILL SEE IS AN ARSE!!
    TREAT EVERY DAY AS YOUR LAST.....ONE DAY YOU WILL BE RIGHT!!

  2. #12
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    Sep 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluenose-1956 View Post
    I worked in the machine tool industry for many years, we always used "Unbrako" hexagon socket cap head bolts. If they're good enough for holding machine tools together, they're good enough for anything.

    Mind you we had human beings assembling the machine tools in those days, not robots.

    Torx head bolts were invented and patented in 1967 by Camcar Textron. The original Torx patent expired 1990, they were replaced by Torx Plus which had a squarer socket which allowed for higher torque settings than the original Torx socket. The Torx head is now generic and is known as the Star head.
    Unbrako; a blast from the past.
    It seems they are still going, albeit as part of Westfield Fasteners.
    Having been apprenticed to the British Thompson Houston (BTH - magnetos & many other things electrical) in Coventry, my father went to Unbrako as a Machine Tool Fitter, 60+ years ago.
    Having passed the apprenticeship, he was given an illuminated scroll & the Freedom of the City. Manufacturing industry was seen as important then.
    I have a set of AF Allen keys, stamped Unbrako, that must have been his. Gives me a lot of pleasure to use them on the bike. Quality stuff.
    Last edited by dipso441; 12-10-2018 at 06:34 PM.

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    bluenose-1956 (12-10-2018)

  4. #13
    Member hawkeyefxr's Avatar
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    Dec 2016
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    Nr Camberley Surrey
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    1999 Super Glide
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    Quote Originally Posted by dipso441 View Post
    Unbrako; a blast from the past.
    It seems they are still going, albeit as part of Westfield Fasteners.
    Having been apprenticed to the British Thompson Houston (BTH - magnetos & many other things electrical) in Coventry, my father went to Unbrako as a Machine Tool Fitter, 60+ years ago.
    Having passed the apprenticeship, he was given an illuminated scroll & the Freedom of the City. Manufacturing industry was seen as important then.
    I have a set of AF Allen keys, stamped Unbrako, that must have been his. Gives me a lot of pleasure to use them on the bike. Quality stuff.
    All i got at the end of my apprenticeship was this tri folded bit of parchment paper with all old english writing on it stating what i earned through my five years starting at 1s-8p1 shilling and 8pence an hour, that about 8p per hour now lol.
    I am sure you dad had a good time as did I, i went a different route at the end of my time though.

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    bluenose-1956 (12-10-2018)

  6. #14
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    If you'd prefer to ride a Harley-Davidson through the winter months the ex-military H-D MT350E is worth considering. These machines were built by H-D in the 1990's, many were bought by the British Armed Forces to be used in active service. Over the past decade the British Military has been retiring these machines and selling them to civilians.

    The MT350E was powered by a bulletproof Rotax 348 cc single cylinder, single overhead cam motor. The motor produces 30 bhp @ 8000 rpm and 21 ft/lbs of torque. The forks were Marzocchi and the stock rear shocks were Ohlins. There are several companies selling these motorcycles for between £1500 and £2000 with a warranty, private sellers are asking £700 to £1200. They make an ideal winter ride.

    2gwf7mr.jpg

  7. #15
    Senior Member
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    Ha did my test on the 500 version. Those Bluenose are truely horrendous bikes

  8. #16
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    Best bike for the winter commute? Lots of plastic, lightweight and easy to stop it falling over; low seat height; reliable; high mpg; keeps the weather off.

    Honda 50.

  9. #17
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wide View Post
    Ha did my test on the 500 version. Those Bluenose are truely horrendous bikes

    The 500 wasn't built by H-D, it was Armstrong in Hull who built those. The 500 didn't have an electric starter, and it had a weak front brake, also the 500 was more vibratory than the 350.

    The H-D version with the 350 motor has an electric starter and a disc front brake, it's a lot more civilised than the Armstrong version.

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