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  1. #11
    Senior Member K9F's Avatar
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    Triumph motorcycles are akin to Avon Tyres, manufactured for the shitty British climate, I doubt you'll have any issues. I had two John Bloor Triumphs and kept one for over 20 years. Great machines with bullet proof engines. Enjoy it! I am sure you will!

    IF YOU GO THROUGH LIFE WITH YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND.....ALL PEOPLE WILL SEE IS AN ARSE!!
    TREAT EVERY DAY AS YOUR LAST.....ONE DAY YOU WILL BE RIGHT!!

  2. #12
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    Triumph motorcycles are akin to Avon Tyres, manufactured for the shitty British climate - including the chain and sprockets?

  3. #13
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    I always preferred using Avon Roadrunners on my Triumph 750 twins, the TSX had an Avon Speedmaster on the front and a 16" Roadrunner on the rear as stock fitment. I couldn't get a rear Roadrunner for the Trident's 19" rear wheel, so I used Dunlop TT100's front and rear on it, those were great tyres in their day too.

    Of course tyre technology has moved on a lot in the last 35 to 40 years.

  4. #14
    Senior Member K9F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluenose-1956 View Post
    Of course tyre technology has moved on a lot in the last 35 to 40 years.
    It would appear from the OP that Harley-Davidson paint finish has not moved much at all!

    Johnny, Both my Trident and Daytona both gave me between 8-10k miles out of my chain and sprockets which I thought was pretty damn good the way I rode them at the time!

    IF YOU GO THROUGH LIFE WITH YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND.....ALL PEOPLE WILL SEE IS AN ARSE!!
    TREAT EVERY DAY AS YOUR LAST.....ONE DAY YOU WILL BE RIGHT!!

  5. #15
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    I don't disagree that a correctly tensioned and cleaned/lubricated chain can last the miles stated however if a bike were truly 'akin to Avon tyres and manufactured for the shitty British climate' then IMO a shaft drive would be superior then a belt and lastly chain.

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  7. #16
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    I've owned two shafty's, both Moto Guzzi's of 1000 cc and 500 cc.

    I found the shaft made the rear wheel a bit twitchy if the throttle was opened in a sporting manner, it seemed like the throttle was directly connected to the back wheel. On wet roads I had to open the throttle with care to avoid the rear tyre sliding due to the torque reaction of the wheel.

    A shaft does have it's benefits in not having to be adjusted regularly, and as long as it's not leaking it won't throw lubricant over your back wheel and tyre.

    I think a chain is the best form of drive for a motorcycle, I got 10k miles out of a 630 'O' ring chain on my old Laverda 1200, their triple motor was a known chain stretcher.

  8. #17
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    Touch wood, other than a few fasteners that ACF50 cleared up ok, my Irons held up ok so far. I do go a bit just with ACF50 though.
    FTW )

  9. #18
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    Someone in this thread says Jap bike finish has gone down a bit lately - I'll bet he never saw Jap bike (or car) finish in the 60s and 70s.......Terrible chrome; terrible paint, lousy metal and welding; rusty bolts and crappy engine finish.

    Mind you, for bad finish, Moto Guzzis in the 80s were bloody awful - the Italians obviously didn't know what rain was. My brand new Le Mans needed new chrome fork sliders in less than 1000 miles because of rust and I had to re-spray the whole bike after 18 months because the paint was so bad - no primer on the frame, just top coat.

    My '97 Ducati wasn't much better than the 80s Guzzis.

    The best Jap bike finish IMO has always been Kawasaki - even the very early ones were better than the other three manufacturers.

    But I would have 80s Moto Guzzi shaft drive over chain or belt; even today.

    My 2008 Sportster finish isn't too bad, certainly much better than the Ducati.

    Paint is good (frame and panels etc) but the nuts and bolts are pretty crap in reality - some weren't even zinc plated.

    Welding on the frame - I have seen Kawasakis with much better looking welds on steel (and aluminium).

    I guess I am lucky the bike hasn't seen many wet days.

    AL

  10. #19
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    I have to agree with you AL about the poor quality of Italian motorcycle paint and chrome finish. My Benelli Sei's paint finish was dreadful, the chrome on it's alternator cover fell off in a sheet that looked like a piece of Baco-Foil. As you'll be aware in the 1970's and 1980's Moto Guzzi and Benelli were sister companies, and they shared the same poor quality finish, my two Moto Guzzi's were testament to that.

    My old Laverda on the other hand had a very good paint and chrome finish, but you paid a premium price for it, Laverda's were never cheap motorcycles being on par with BMW price wise. Laverda used Bosch electrical components, the clocks were Nippon Denso and looked like those on a period Honda CB750, the switchgear was the same as that used on period Suzuki's. Hesketh, also a premium brand used Nippon Denso instrumentation and Suzuki switchgear on their V1000 models.

    Hesketh-V1000-instruments-were-not-premium-quality.jpg Hesketh-V1000-no-Hesketh-pilot-is-ever-short-of-space.jpg


    Here's the 2018 Hesketh "Valiant" it's powered by an S & S supercharged 2100 cc motor, price is an eye watering £50k.

    hesketh-motorcycles-2018-valiant-sc-15.jpghesketh-motorcycles-2018-valiant-sc-12.jpg

    As for car finish, I remember our school music teacher drove a Datsun Cherry, within it's first year the paint and chrome finishes were rusting badly. In the 1980's Alfa Romeo cars were rusting as soon as they came out of the shipping containers. Cheap, nasty, shoddy finishes won't sell a vehicle whether it has two wheels or four, most people buy with their eyes not their hearts.

  11. #20
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    I just dont think a Harley makes a great commuter. Full stop. Ive done 25k miles on Sporties over the past 3 years, all pleasure and in some attrocious conditions when Ive been out...but, after those type of rides Ive deadicated a serious deep clean regime. Commute cleaning tends to be quick squirt off with water, drip dry and a bit of soapy sponge over bits and bobs...probably because you just get home from work, get a quick job done, and get back in the house for tea and chill, while the bike drip drys until next use. I know a sporty can handle a commute, why shoulnt it, but it wont last the abuse for sure. My 2 Sporties were mint when I got rid of them despite the mileage with nil corrosion, bar for the odd furry fastener. Id buy a Bandit 600/CB 500 for the commute and Sporty for fun, if I had to commute

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