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  1. #1
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    XL1200C 2007 Shocks

    Hi Guys,
    Need some info.
    I am going to change my rear shocks on my XL1200C to Progressive 444 shocks.
    But having issues with correct tools for undoing the top and bottom bolts.
    The top looks like a large alan bolt and the bottom is a large Torx.
    Would anybody know the size so I can buy the correct tools ?
    If image has attached to this post they are numbers 1 & 2 on schematic below
    Many thanks
    Mel.

    XL1200C Shocks.JPG

    XL1200c 2007 American Import.

  2. #2
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    They should both be the same size Torx - T50
    They differ in that the lower bolt is shouldered.

  3. #3
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    Do you also have some Loctite 243 and a torque wrench?

    I use torx on 1/2" and 3/8" drive to use with torque wrench.

    If you are buying the shocks new you will need to fit the inserts to the rubber bushes. They are very tight. I used a vice to press them in.

    Oh and it is worth getting a work shop manual for the torque settings and at least one way to do the job.
    Last edited by Andy from Sandy; 06-21-2018 at 12:12 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Johnnythefox is correct, you'll need a T50 to undo the button heads.

    The upper one is a set screw 1/2-13 x 2-1/4", it screws into a blind hole.
    The lower one is a bolt 1/2-20 x 2-1/2", there is a nut on the inside, you'll need a 3/4" AF spanner to hold the nut.

    009.jpg


    After the new shocks are installed, torque the bolts to 45 -50 ft/lbs or 61 -68 Nm.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Face's Avatar
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    You’re also going to need a trolley jack or a strong mate who doesn’t mind pulling his back out to get the new shocks back in. There are some other techniques but could cause some damage to the bike if you don’t know what you’re doing. Other than that it might be worth getting a mechanic to do it along with another job that needs doing such as a new back tyre or powder coating the swing arm, the shocks would have to come off during this process and would be a simple job of putting the new shocks back into place when the bike is being put back together.

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    bluenose-1956 (06-21-2018)

  7. #6
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    Thanks all for your replies, some great info, much appreciated.
    I have managed to buy a Torx set which includes a Torx 50 and a few other tools that I did not have to do the job.(like a vice for the work bench, to put the sleeves in)
    Will tackle the job next weekend.
    Hopefully will go ok.
    Regards
    Mel

    XL1200c 2007 American Import.

  8. #7
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    Hi Guys,
    Just rechecked top of my shocks and pics are below, are these Hex as they do not look like Torx?
    If are Hex what size?
    Regards
    Mel.
    Hex 1.jpg
    Hex 2.jpg

    XL1200c 2007 American Import.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    They are definitely hex socket and most probably chromed - seem to bright for stainless.

    It's a one man job - All you need to change the shocks are the following:

    A bike jack or a low scissor jack; the correct bits for the bolts and a torque wrench.

    Crack all the shock bolts so they are one turn undone.

    Stick the jack under both the frame tubes and lift the rear end until the rear wheel is just off the ground - make sure the bike is stable enough to be worked on.

    Remove the bottom bolt from one shock and the then the top bolt.

    If your new shocks are the same length as the old ones, just fit the bottom eye / bolt first - do not tighten.

    Check that you can get the top bolt in - my guess is you will have to drop the rear so the wheel is just touching the ground; equally you may have to lift the rear a bit more.

    Do both bolts up so they are just about starting to tighten - if you overdo it, you could rock the bike off the jack.

    Now do the other side the same way (lift the rear first so the wheel is just off the ground). Repeat everything as for the first side.

    Drop the bike onto the wheel and sidestand and remove the jack.

    Now torque the bolts up. - Simple.

    AL

  10. #9
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Hi Mel,

    You'll need a 5/16" hexagon bit for those screws.

    Looks like someone's replaced the stock torx BZP button heads with hexagon socket chrome plated ones.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gettin'onabit View Post
    They are definitely hex socket and most probably chromed - seem to bright for stainless.

    It's a one man job - All you need to change the shocks are the following:

    A bike jack or a low scissor jack; the correct bits for the bolts and a torque wrench.

    Crack all the shock bolts so they are one turn undone.

    Stick the jack under both the frame tubes and lift the rear end until the rear wheel is just off the ground - make sure the bike is stable enough to be worked on.

    Remove the bottom bolt from one shock and the then the top bolt.

    If your new shocks are the same length as the old ones, just fit the bottom eye / bolt first - do not tighten.

    Check that you can get the top bolt in - my guess is you will have to drop the rear so the wheel is just touching the ground; equally you may have to lift the rear a bit more.

    Do both bolts up so they are just about starting to tighten - if you overdo it, you could rock the bike off the jack.

    Now do the other side the same way (lift the rear first so the wheel is just off the ground). Repeat everything as for the first side.

    Drop the bike onto the wheel and sidestand and remove the jack.

    Now torque the bolts up. - Simple.

    AL

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