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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gettin'onabit View Post
    It seems obvious to me that a Low isn't going to be suitable for your build, Chris. The 'T' looked a pretty good bike though... Forward controls footpegs on the Low... are a bit too close to the road when in a corner for my liking, so I may fit the stock footpegs instead...

    I wouldn't worry about the 'emulsion single sided adjustable shock' if one is fitted on the bike you want - it's just the way the suspension is on some of the later models - and there is no reason why you couldn't upgrade it if you needed to.

    BTW - My Hagon shocks 1-1/2" longer than stock were lower cost than the Mustang seat...
    Yes Al, you're right again: a Low wouldn't really work... ah... 'for my build'. The 1200T was lovely though and, like your Low, I really liked the handle bar height/position/size. It's so comfortable and feels, you know, way cool. However, the Customs are not for me so it's back to square one - looking for another Roadster (or Iron). (I am really champing at the bit here!)

    I did some suspension research and found that 'Progressive' is a brand name (I kinda' thought it was a suspension operation or specification... most embarassing) and 'emulsion' refers to the gas & oil 'mixing' (so to speak) inside the shocks. You live and learn. I also found that Harley do something called 'Premium Ride Emulsion Shocks': 54000076. From what I've read, they're rated highly, like Progressive 430s, but at £613.46, that's just not going to happen any time soon (although those who've ugraded seem delighted with them).

    Your shocks look fine Al, I wouldn't have noticed any difference from standard. I had imagined that the back end would be 'hanging in the air' (as it were) but it doesn't look any different. I suppose that's the point! I'm glad its working for you, even through my own jealousy...

    I, however, am now beginning my search again: Roadster/Iron focused. I could do with a Stage 1 and Shortshots too... I may start a new thread.

    Thanks Al,

    Cheers,

    Chris

  2. #12
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    Actually 'Progressive' may well be a brand name with particular reference to Harleys; but 'progressive' is also a suspension spring classification/operation ie; as opposed to 'linear' springs, both of which can be found on most other motorcycles.

    Many 'newer' road going bikes tend to having progressive suspension as standard, or owners have progressive springs fitted instead of stock linear ones on older bikes; whereas in my experience road-racers seem to prefer linear springs.

    If you need to find really good shocks at a sensible price by a really good specialist manufacturer, you could always talk to Dave at Hagon.

    He will make you shocks which are suited to your bike; your weight and requirements - all done over the phone or by email (unless you want to ride to their premises) - delivery FOC.

    PS - My new shocks are different to stock ones - they are slightly larger in diameter and they don't have a slotted black plastic sleeve over the damper body. The stock damper body is chrome and the sleeve seems to create rust stains, but the Hagon shocks have stainless steel damper body and top shroud.

    You can see it below on this older photo - (actually both my photos are out of date as I now have the twin clocks arrangement fitted).

    AL
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    Last edited by Gettin'onabit; 03-31-2018 at 05:11 PM.

  3. #13
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    Have you ridden an Iron Chris? My 16' has 13 1/2" Nitrogen shocks as standard. Seems like that may solve your comfort and ride height problem plus you can mod/customise it to suit yourself! I'm 6'1" and was 94kgs pre HA and it was fine, you've seen my footrest mods for my long legs.

  4. #14
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gettin'onabit View Post
    Actually 'Progressive' may well be a brand name with particular reference to Harleys; but 'progressive' is also a suspension spring classification/operation ie; as opposed to 'linear' springs, both of which can be found on most other motorcycles.

    Many 'newer' road going bikes tend to having progressive suspension as standard, or owners have progressive springs fitted instead of stock linear ones on older bikes; whereas in my experience road-racers seem to prefer linear springs.

    If you need to find really good shocks at a sensible price by a really good specialist manufacturer, you could always talk to Dave at Hagon.

    He will make you shocks which are suited to your bike; your weight and requirements - all done over the phone or by email (unless you want to ride to their premises) - delivery FOC.

    PS - My new shocks are different to stock ones - they are slightly larger in diameter and they don't have a slotted black plastic sleeve over the damper body. The stock damper body is chrome and the sleeve seems to create rust stains, but the Hagon shocks have stainless steel damper body and top shroud.

    You can see it below on this older photo - (actually both my photos are out of date as I now have the twin clocks arrangement fitted).

    AL

    You're spot on again AL,

    Just for those members who aren't aware of the difference between linear springs and progressive springs. A linear spring is wound with the same distance between each coil over it's total length. A progressive spring is wound with a larger gap between it's coils at one end and the gap becomes progressively smaller towards the other end. See the diagrams below.

    xhyper-springs.jpg ss2001-What-is-Dual-Rate-Updated-1.jpg


    Progressive is also the brand name of an American automotive suspension manufacturer.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to bluenose-1956 For This Useful Post:

    Alec L (04-01-2018), ChrisOfTheOT (04-02-2018), Uncle Ed (04-01-2018)

  6. #15
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    Dave is a mine of information.......


    .....so make sure you don't tread on him.






    PS. A lot of racers pre-load the linear springs by having a tubular insert spacer inside the fork leg; for forks that generally don't have pre-load adjusters.
    Last edited by Gettin'onabit; 04-01-2018 at 10:50 AM.

  7. #16
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    There are quite a few of us on here of “advancing years” with Low Sporties who have the same problems. My cure (I am 67, fat, 5’ 10 with short 29” legs) was to fit Hagon Progressive fork springs with preload tubes tuned to my bulk, plus second hand 2017 long (13 1/4”) Showa/HD emulsion shocks off an Iron. I also have a Sundowner dual seat and forward controls. Comfort is superb, cornering much improved, steering only slightly quicker and seat height a bit higher (only a problem getting on because of the fat seat) Bike is a 2009 1200L.
    Total cost of suspension upgrades £250.
    Sorted! 😄

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    bluenose-1956 (04-01-2018)

  9. #17
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    Photo of the finished article:
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  11. #18
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    [QUOTE=bluenose-1956;36893]...Just for those members who aren't aware of the difference between linear springs and progressive springs. A linear spring is wound with the same distance between each coil over it's total length. A progressive spring is wound with a larger gap between it's coils at one end and the gap becomes progressively smaller towards the other end... /QUOTE]

    I am such a member! Honestly Dave, you're a gem. Thanks for that, it's so helpful & clear. As Al says, a real mine of information.

    No, I have not ridden an Iron - I had intended to go to Riders on Saturday and blag a test but didn't. (And, like the true geneius that I am, I have a test ride next week on the 1200 Custom: see my next post...)

    Thanks again gents - you're a great bunch.

    Cheers,

    Chris

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  13. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldvelonut View Post
    There are quite a few of us on here of “advancing years” with Low Sporties who have the same problems. My cure (I am 67, fat, 5’ 10 with short 29” legs) was to fit Hagon Progressive fork springs with preload tubes tuned to my bulk, plus second hand 2017 long (13 1/4”) Showa/HD emulsion shocks off an Iron. I also have a Sundowner dual seat and forward controls. Comfort is superb, cornering much improved, steering only slightly quicker and seat height a bit higher (only a problem getting on because of the fat seat) Bike is a 2009 1200L.
    Total cost of suspension upgrades £250.
    Sorted! 😄
    Interesting that both you and Al recommend Hagon. I've contacted them to see what they say. As I said to Dave above, I was set on a Roadster (two lovely ones on eBay right now: 2010 beautiful Roadster for £4300/offers, and a 2015 Iron bidding at £5100.) Either of which would be by far the more sensibile choice...

    But I figured I'd be spending all this money so I may as well spend it all on the bike I really want. And, well, the whiskey & black Custom turns out to be the bike I have wanted for thirty years. Since that's the case, I have to make the suspension work for me. Whilst £600 Harley Premium shocks are not an option, £200-£300 on "progressive" fork springs and shocks certainly are. When I checked previously, all I found from Harley was a Screamin Eagle Piggback Shock kit (54000125) for £745 and Screamin' Eagle Fully Adjustable Front Fork Kit (45400176) for £608.87. Yea, right...

    However, (pukka) Progressive 430s and 'Monotube fork cartridge kit' are about £800 together - still too much, but since you gents keenly mention Hagon, I had a look. Although I couldn't find the 2016 Custom listed on their site, (from memory) the 2009 ones are and some suspsension/spring sets are under £400 - though I couldn't find mention of heavy duty springs, which Progressive say is advisable for chunkers, like me ("...220-230 lbs": Progressive YouTube video).

    Anyway guys, I'll let you know. For now, since you kind and knowledgable gents have found ways to make your Lows work, I should be able to find a workable solution for a Custom's suspension woes.

    I hope so, anyway.

    Cheers again gents,

    Chris

    P.S. Is 'velo' Velocette?

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  15. #20
    Senior Member Gettin'onabit's Avatar
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    Chris - If you talk to Dave at Hagon, I am pretty certain he could supply you with a pair of rear shocks that will easily do the job for under £250.

    If you are looking at a Custom or a Low don't forget that you would be sitting fairly well back from the front end; therefore IMO you might want to pay more attention to the rear suspension than the front.

    So the rear end is where I would start if I were you; and at least it means you aren't chucking money at the bike you want as an additional large expenditure - do it in stages.

    I don't intend to change my Low front suspension and have only done the rear - I see no sense in spending out on something that doesn't need changing, even if it is the basic stock item.

    AL

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