Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Halifax, United Kingdom.
    My Ride
    2011 XL883N Iron
    Posts
    3,676
    Thanked: 1259

    Harley-Davidson Hardware list.

    Here is a list of Harley-Davidson hardware (fasteners), it converts the H-D part number to it's description and size. It's by no means a comprehensive list, but I thought it'll come in handy for members who wish to replace their corroded stock fasteners and avoid paying H-D's high prices. H-D stopped giving the specification of their fasteners many years ago in the hope that owners would have to buy their overpriced junk by using the H-D part numbers alone.

    Once you know what you want you can go to your local hardware store and buy them yourself in either zinc plated or stainless steel.

    img091.jpg img092.jpg img093.jpg img094.jpg img095.jpg img096.jpg img097.jpg img098.jpg
    Last edited by bluenose-1956; 03-12-2018 at 10:46 PM.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to bluenose-1956 For This Useful Post:

    Alec L (03-13-2018), Andy from Sandy (03-18-2018), Johnnythefox (03-13-2018), Mark 883 (03-13-2018), Not too old (03-17-2018)

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    My Ride
    '16 Iron
    Posts
    172
    Thanked: 63
    Thanks for all that effort Dave! Good job!

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Not too old For This Useful Post:

    bluenose-1956 (03-17-2018)

  5. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    My Ride
    2017 Harley-Davidson XL1200T
    Posts
    127
    Thanked: 45
    When looking to see whether you can use stainless steel bolts or not I did a quick google -

    Stainless steel bolts are, in most cases, just slightly stronger than Grade 2 hardware store junk bolts, and in nearly all cases, significantly less than Grade 5. You do NOT want to use common-grade stainless fasteners in any application that would call for a hardened (Grade 5 or Grade 8, or stronger) fastener.

    The gradings HD list are American (obviously). Here we use a different scale. I found this looking for the answer:
    US Grade 2 = approx metric property class 5.8
    US Grade 5 = approx metric property class 8.8
    US Grade 8= approx metric property class 10.9

    There is also a metric property class 12.9 that is stronger than US Grade 8.

    Thank you for taking the time for posting.
    Last edited by Andy from Sandy; 03-18-2018 at 09:57 AM.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Andy from Sandy For This Useful Post:

    bluenose-1956 (03-18-2018)

  7. #4
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Halifax, United Kingdom.
    My Ride
    2011 XL883N Iron
    Posts
    3,676
    Thanked: 1259
    Thanks for your post Andy,

    You are of course correct about the tensile shear strength of A2-70 and A4-80 grades of stainless steel being between the US grade 2 and grade 5. I use stainless bolts on my engine cases, handlebar clamps, fender mounts, footrest mounts, drive belt guard support, muffler mounts and yoke pinch bolts etc. I'd never use them for high stress areas such as brake caliper mounts, brake disc mounts or on the transmission drive train.

    There are special high tensile stainless disc bolts available, but they're expensive to buy. For most external motorcycle applications the metric class 8.8 and 10.9 is fine, if you want a better finish, you can buy self colour high tensile fasteners and take them along to your local electro-platers and have them coated in either bright zinc, chrome, brass, copper or even 24K gold. You can have a sack full of fasteners zinc plated for about a fiver, yes £5 zinc plating is really that cheap.

    12.9 grade is for industrial applications, I used to order 12.9 grade fasteners for use on concrete producing machinery when I worked for Marshalls PLC. I also used them for machine tool applications. I used to work for a manufacturer of lithographic processing machinery, they used A4-80 grade stainless on their drive rollers, they also used stainless drive chain and sprockets. These machines ran at a slow constant speed, so the stainless was never under any great amount of stress. Motorcycles on the other hand are highly stressed machines, constantly changing gear and braking puts a strain on their components so regular stainless isn't suitable.

    If anyone has doubts about using stainless steel on their motorcycle, they don't have to use it, if you can afford to use titanium bolts, they offer corrosion resistance and are strong enough to be used for racing machinery. Titanium is also lighter in weight than high tensile steel or stainless steel.

    I hope this has helped members to decide if stainless steel fasteners are right or wrong for their application needs.

    Cheers,

    Dave.
    Last edited by bluenose-1956; 03-18-2018 at 11:17 PM.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •