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  1. #11
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    I must admit I do like the look of the new Fat Bob and it gets some impressive reviews. I spoke to a guy who has ridden one yesterday (and all the 2018 bikes) and he thinks it is the best Harley he has ever ridden. I do prefer the air cooled engines (and yes I do know all engines are air cooled before someone makes a smart remark). The main advantage over my Lowrider S would be the increased lean angle, I can't even get round a medium bend or roundabout without dragging the pegs even at low speeds. I have been lucky so far that nothing has dug in, I'm not trying to ride like a sports bike, but the lack of corner speed is embarrassing at times.

    On a different note, Buck how did you get on with your tuning at Lee Motorcycles?
    To the world you may be one person but to one person you may be the world

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by xbpod View Post
    I must admit I do like the look of the new Fat Bob and it gets some impressive reviews. I spoke to a guy who has ridden one yesterday (and all the 2018 bikes) and he thinks it is the best Harley he has ever ridden. I do prefer the air cooled engines (and yes I do know all engines are air cooled before someone makes a smart remark). The main advantage over my Lowrider S would be the increased lean angle, I can't even get round a medium bend or roundabout without dragging the pegs even at low speeds. I have been lucky so far that nothing has dug in, I'm not trying to ride like a sports bike, but the lack of corner speed is embarrassing at times.

    On a different note, Buck how did you get on with your tuning at Lee Motorcycles?
    Hi xbpod


    I went with a local guy who checked Harley's set up using the supertuner (I bought the optional leads to allow anyone to alter the tuning), and unsurprisingly, they hadn't done a very good job as they only use generic maps for their own kit and download this irrespective of what pipes you have fitted. He reckons I'll still benefit from dyno time so I have yet to book in with lee, but that is still the plan, even though the bike currently rides really well.

    I agree with you on the Fat Bob. Of all the new line up, it's the one that stands out for me as it retains nice clean simple lines and as you say, has improved lean angle. I liked the Dyna Low Rider S that I had for a week or two, but as with your experience, I found that it was limited in lean angle. Changing the rear shocks to increase ride height by an inch works wonders though (a visit to Hagons?). I don't reckon you can push any Harley like a sports bike, having come off sports bikes which I've ridden for the past 30 odd years. They are what they are but it can be frustrating when you sling your leg over something as capable as the Low Rider S.
    Last edited by BuckhornBud; 09-08-2017 at 11:26 AM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckhornBud View Post
    I think you've summed it up nice and succinctly there Whistler.

    I too like the twin shock look, and (referring to other comments on this thread) even the latest Harley range can be described as "relics" compared to the far more cutting edge designs from the East, and from Austria and Bavaria. Describing the Sportster line up as "relics" is disingenuous as it misrepresents what they are, and to whom they appeal....misses the point completely. I have transformed mine from standard, with the help of people like Hagon and engine tuning specialists to make it handle and go like it should have done from standard. It's a complete hoot to ride now.

    There's also no "green eyed monster" about it. I am very fortunate, in that if I wanted to, I could easily go out and buy a brand new model from anywhere in the range, even if it set me back £30K. It wouldn't dent the finances. I choose not to because having ridden most of last year's range, only three bikes really appealed to me:

    The Street Bob, the Low rider S and the Sportster XL1200. Bought the Sportster because with a little fettling, it gives little real world performance away to the others, is more nimble and I just liked the styling of the Custom model with its very 1950's retro looks, spoked wheels and clean lines. It represents a gentler and much simpler age, and the beauty for me is in both the simplicity and rugged, proven reliability of those models. I tend to put up a fair few miles on the bike, my first service due well before a month of riding was up, and I have enoyed every mile of that ride, and the imrovements I've made to the bike since then.

    Harley were forced through tighter emissions standards to move the game on, towards water cooled (partial water cooling) big twins. Power gains are minimal but the spread of power and torque has been spread out over a more useful range. However, the older 110 CI of the Low Rider S still kicks sand in their collective fins in shear grunt (according to some reports by those who have ridden both).

    Whatever people think of the new range, I wish Harley well and hope that they continue to have a strong future, but their new line up is definitely not for me, and I won't be investing in anything from their current revamped range. If I want a modern hi-tech tourer or sports bike, I wouldn't buy any Harley. It's not what they're about and its not what they do as well as others.
    I have the bike I want to, my dream bike , my lowly little iron. It's not a big money bike, or the fastest, but it's mine bought and paid for. I don't care what others ride, what it cost, I just care that they ride and keep the lifestyle alive and the MOCO in the black. I remember my first trip to biketoberfest years ago. It was full of hugely expensive, beautiful customs, but the guys riding them looked like they'd dressed for the occasion, and the gear was as new as the bikes. It was the bikes that had been ridden hard and looked after were the ones I liked, mostly sportsters and bathers. These were the ones that were ridden. I'm not looking to change my iron, ever, I bought it with that in mind. I'll tweak it, customise it, but it'll always be my bike. The design is old school and its the "relic" look that got me hooked.
    FTW )

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  5. #14
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xbpod View Post
    I must admit I do like the look of the new Fat Bob and it gets some impressive reviews. I spoke to a guy who has ridden one yesterday (and all the 2018 bikes) and he thinks it is the best Harley he has ever ridden. I do prefer the air cooled engines (and yes I do know all engines are air cooled before someone makes a smart remark). The main advantage over my Lowrider S would be the increased lean angle, I can't even get round a medium bend or roundabout without dragging the pegs even at low speeds. I have been lucky so far that nothing has dug in, I'm not trying to ride like a sports bike, but the lack of corner speed is embarrassing at times.

    On a different note, Buck how did you get on with your tuning at Lee Motorcycles?
    It just goes to show that we all have different opinions, it's the one I like the least, but I respect your opinion to like it. And I hope it sells by the bucket load. The one I like is Street Bob.
    FTW )

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  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whistler View Post
    I have the bike I want to, my dream bike , my lowly little iron. It's not a big money bike, or the fastest, but it's mine bought and paid for. I don't care what others ride, what it cost, I just care that they ride and keep the lifestyle alive and the MOCO in the black. I remember my first trip to biketoberfest years ago. It was full of hugely expensive, beautiful customs, but the guys riding them looked like they'd dressed for the occasion, and the gear was as new as the bikes. It was the bikes that had been ridden hard and looked after were the ones I liked, mostly sportsters and bathers. These were the ones that were ridden. I'm not looking to change my iron, ever, I bought it with that in mind. I'll tweak it, customise it, but it'll always be my bike. The design is old school and its the "relic" look that got me hooked.


    Amen to that whistler. I feel the same way about my Custom. It's everything I want in a bike now. Sedate? maybe, but it's nimble, comfy enough for 2-up touring and grunty enough too. It is a joy to ride and gets ridden in all weathers. Most maintenance I'll do at home myself. Nothing in the new range would do it any better than my own and I don't intend on changing it....ever.

    Like you, it amuses me to turn up at the odd bike event and see those turning up on spangly new Harleys with new lumberjack shirts and matt black open face helmets, all looking like the urban clones that they seem to have become, complete with skull head overs to scare the kiddies and old folk in an attempt to look "bad ass". I have noticed though at several events now that it's the sportsters and the older soft tail tourers which seem to be the ones which rack up the miles.

    I saw a pretty ancient soft tail de-lux with star-ship miles on it a few months back, and it was a bit oily, messy and had bits of wire holding the odd thing on. The fish tail pipes were discoloured, the saddle creased and cracked and the peg rubbers all but worn away. The rider had an ancient old brown leather jacket on, as tired looking as the bike, with a scarf and open face helmet, and long old fashioned riding gauntlets. His white whispy moustache was nicotine stained but he wore a huge grin from ear to ear on his face as he started it up and rode away. He's probably had more enjoyment on that bike, which could tell a 1000 stories, than most urban cruisers could ever imagine. Don't get me wrong....nothing wrong with urban cruisers or urban cruising, but it's just refreshing to see a time worn bike and rider with many 1000's of miles under their belts, and no wish to upgrade to the latest and greatest because their bikes, just like yours and mine, do everything a bike ever needed to for them.
    Last edited by BuckhornBud; 09-08-2017 at 11:46 AM.

  8. #16
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    I agree there needs to be all kinds of riders to keep it all lively. I don't do bike nights much for the reasons you state, preferring the Cove, which is a nice balance of different bikes and riders. Me I'm the time worn kind, time worn and proud, but the new urban riders are bringing something to the table and I respect their right too.
    FTW )

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  10. #17
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    Agree with all the above, something for everyone. Bought my S with the thoughts of it being my ideal bike and probably the last one I would ever buy, off the Spain for 10 days next week on it, so it will be the final test if it is the ONE. Hope I can get around the ground clearance issue as love the bike apart from that.
    To the world you may be one person but to one person you may be the world

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by xbpod View Post
    Agree with all the above, something for everyone. Bought my S with the thoughts of it being my ideal bike and probably the last one I would ever buy, off the Spain for 10 days next week on it, so it will be the final test if it is the ONE. Hope I can get around the ground clearance issue as love the bike apart from that.
    Honestly, I'd recommend raising the ride height up a little. I gained a good few degrees clearance on mine and can now fling it into corners where I'd fear to tip-toe around previously. The shocks on the "S" are better than the standard set-ups but can still be easily bettered and for not a lot of money if you go to Hagon. I've no regrets going that route with mine as it's transformed the bike. You'll not lose much of the low rider look at just an inch but it will enhance the ride considerably and for the better. Running small mini-boards (hinged) in place of longer pegs also is good.

    Have a great time in Spain and let us know how you get on (with photos!).

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  13. #19
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xbpod View Post
    Agree with all the above, something for everyone. Bought my S with the thoughts of it being my ideal bike and probably the last one I would ever buy, off the Spain for 10 days next week on it, so it will be the final test if it is the ONE. Hope I can get around the ground clearance issue as love the bike apart from that.
    Let us know how you get on in Spain . Enjoy
    FTW )

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  15. #20
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    Well, in the interests of impartiality, I have just come off the phone with Harley and have arranged a test ride on the new Street Bob as soon as their demo model comes in which will be next month. The dealer has ridden one and reckons that he was keeping up with bimmers and Dukes on a ride out. He can't speak highly enough about it but agrees that the styling will put a lot of people off the new range.

    The main points he got across though were that there's practically nothing remaining in the DNA of the new bikes, shared with the old. It is the very first time that Harley have produced an entire range from the ground-up using CAD designed frames, engines and even the seats are all new (and gel padded!). As good as they're reported to be (and I have no doubt that they're very good), the styling simply doesn't do it for me. Perhaps it will grow on me in time but for now, I can't see myself changing the Sporty.

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