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  1. #1
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Stripped thread? It can be repaired using a Helicoil threaded insert.

    If you have a damaged thread on your pride & joy, whether it's your fault or a previous owners, it can be a daunting experience for someone who's new to motorcycle maintenance. The thought of having to possibly buy a new engine casing or frame could be a nightmare.

    However help is at hand in the form of a Helicoil Thread Repair Kit.

    You can buy Imperial UNC & UNF Thread Repair Kits from Tracy Tools Ltd in Torquay, South Devon.

    For example a 1/4" x 20 UNC kit from Tracy Tools costs £25 plus p&p. The kit contains everything you need to make a sound permanent repair.

    Tracy Tools Ltd's website is www.tracytools.com

    Here is a short video showing how easy it is to repair a damaged thread by using a Helicoil Thread Repair Kit.


    Last edited by bluenose-1956; 01-09-2017 at 03:33 PM.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member K9F's Avatar
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    If it's a stud, blind hole, or high torque bolt Wurth Time-Sert Inserts are also worth due consideration as they are much more robust and reliable as it isn't a spring insert but a complete thread. They are however a damn sight more expensive as a result.


    IF YOU GO THROUGH LIFE WITH YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND.....ALL PEOPLE WILL SEE IS AN ARSE!!
    TREAT EVERY DAY AS YOUR LAST.....ONE DAY YOU WILL BE RIGHT!!

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  5. #3
    Senior Member Whistler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluenose-1956 View Post
    If you have a damaged thread on your pride & joy, whether it's your fault or a previous owners, it can be a daunting experience for someone who's new to motorcycle maintenance. The thought of having to possibly buy a new engine casing or frame could be a nightmare.

    However help is at hand in the form of a Helicoil Thread Repair Kit.

    You can buy Imperial UNC & UNF Thread Repair Kits from Tracy Tools Ltd in Torquay, South Devon.

    For example a 1/4" x 20 UNC kit from Tracy Tools costs £25 plus p&p. The kit contains everything you need to make a sound permanent repair.

    Tracy Tools Ltd's website is www.tracytools.com

    Here is a short video showing how easy it is to repair a damaged thread by using a Helicoil Thread Repair Kit.


    Handy to know, thanks
    FTW )

  6. #4
    Member triple&twin's Avatar
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    As usual, Bluenose-1956 has given an answer to a question before It’s even asked! How does he do it?

    I’ve discovered a stripped thread on 1 of the derby cover securing screws (while adjusting the clutch clearance - very proud of myself…).

    The suppliers told me ‘get the drilling bit right and the rest is easy’, and also suggested I would need a plug tap ‘a plug tap has no lead, so you can’t start a thread with one but it will cut a thread to the bottom of your hole’.

    I’m ordering this kit today but thought I’d ask if anyone has ever done this on the Derby cover (why is it called that?) and has any advice.

    I know the best advice is to remove the primary chain case, put it on a bench and use a pillar drill – but I don’t have a pillar drill, and don’t fancy removing the case. I was hoping to do it in-situ…

    Is there enough material in the casting to drill it out?

    Took ages to type this on a phone!

  7. #5
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Hello Nigel,

    Many H-D riders have asked the question "Why is it called a Derby Cover instead of a Clutch Cover"?

    The answer goes back to the early days of Harley-Davidson engine design, originally the clutch inspection cover was a flat circular piece of steel which was painted black resembled the rim of an American Derby Hat known as a Bowler Hat here in the UK. The cover became known as the Derby Cover from then on. As the shape of the cover changed to a dished shape, the original nickname Derby Cover stuck and H-D adopted it as it's official description. So today the Clutch Inspection Cover is still known as the Derby Cover.

    As for repairing your stripped thread, with care you can do it without removing the Primary Drive Case, try to get your bike in an upright position ideally on a motorcycle lift. You can use an ordinary corded or cordless electric pistol drill, make sure that you drill the hole squarely to the Primary Cover. The rest is easy as in the video, make sure that you don't get any swarf in to your clutch by bunging up the hole with a clean rag or covering it with Duck Tape or something similar. When installing the helicoil insert smear a little Loctite 271 (red) on the outside threads to make sure that it doesn't come out again, you do want a permanent repair.

    Don't forget to post a photo of the finished job to let other members see how it looks. It's a pity the previous owner didn't realise that you should never overtighten steel fasteners into aluminium casings. The screws on the Derby cover are really best torqued to the correct setting, if you don't have a torque wrench tighten then and run the engine, if it weeps oil simply nip up the screws a bit more.

    Cheers,

    Dave.

  8. #6
    Member triple&twin's Avatar
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    Thanks Dave.
    That's a fillip I needed. I swing from 'Oh my God I'll screw the whole thing up' to 'C'mon, lets sort this..'.
    I have the torque wrench, a good drill, just lacking the Cahoonas...

  9. #7
    Member triple&twin's Avatar
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    In case anyone else is in this position...

    This has been fixed and is, so far, holding up.

    A Helicoil type thread insert was fitted.

    I didn't actually fit it but I will the next time. A colleague who has done this a few times before did it while I watched, passed things, and learned.

    Bottom tap was purchased and used as it was a blind hole. The insert was looser than we thought it should be when inserting but it holds. Even if it were to try to unscrew the cover would hold it in place. Some loctite was used on the helicoil to be sure.

    Top tips he gave me was to go very steady as you reach the bottom of the hole with the tap in case it bottoms out and strips, and to remove a tap in the same way you put it in; 1/2 turn out, then quarter turn back in etc. or you could strip your new thread!

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  11. #8
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    Does anyone know what size helicoil kit i would need for the sump nut in a streetbob? Also, Ca the repair be done on bike on a jack or do you need to take the sump off?

    Thanks,
    Ben

  12. #9
    Senior Member bluenose-1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benine15 View Post
    Does anyone know what size helicoil kit i would need for the sump nut in a streetbob? Also, Ca the repair be done on bike on a jack or do you need to take the sump off?

    Thanks,
    Ben

    Hello Ben,

    The oil sump drain plug for Dyna's is 1/2-20 thread, that's standard 1/2" UNF (Unified National Fine). The plug has a magnet to stop metal swarf from finding it's way into your transmission.

    601-030_A.jpg


    You'll have to remove the sump to fit a helicoil. You need to drill a larger hole to accept the helicoil insert, you won't want swarf from your drill to get into your motor that's why it's best to remove the sump altogether. Instead of fitting a helicoil which some people don't like using anyway, you could drill and tap the drain hole to a larger size, even a metric size like M14 x 1.5 (14mm isometric fine). An M14 x 1.5 tap will cost a lot less than a Helicoil kit, that size is commonly used on Honda's and other Japanese motorcycles.

    A magnetic M14 x 1.5 Sump Plug.

    dc801465-bdb1-4dc1-a7a2-198a9692c63c.jpg

    They're available in different colours too.

    M14-1-5MM-Engine-Dress-Up-Magnetic-Oil-Drain-Plug-Package-Oil-Sump-drain-plug-for.jpg

    Hope that's helped you.
    Last edited by bluenose-1956; 02-13-2018 at 03:32 PM.

  13. #10
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    Thanks Dave. That's really helpful indeed. Thanks for taking the time for the detailed response. I think i will try the drill and tap approach as suggested. I will let you know how it goes.

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